Tuesday, February 27, 2018

February News

Guys, February was something of a deluge. Ten poems in four magazines! I'm so pleased to share this with you.

In Turnip Truck(s), two short poems appeared. One was "Pisces," which I wrote for fellow poet Eve Brackenbury to wish her a happy birthday a few years back. The other was "Nests."

Five : 2 : One Magazine's #sideshow featured five short poems, "The Bus Ride," "Asphalt Fruit," "Looks Back Into You," "Running Barefoot" and "The God Sieve." You can not only read them, but you can listen to me read them! I notice that, more and more, lit mags are looking for multimedia submissions. I don't think I'll ever be cool enough to create short videos, or to properly perform my work like a real spoken-word artist would. All the same, I hope you enjoy my dulcet tones, along with the words.

Ramingo's Porch included not only my poem, "Retconning," but an interview as well. You can read the latter on Ramingo's Blog here.

And finally, in Mermaid Mirror, an anthology of all women and women-identified writers, I had two poems appear, "Scenes From a Women's Bathroom Stall" and "Mi Pelo."

If you enjoy my poetry, swing on over to Instagram and check out my poetry account, @laurenscharhag. A lovely person there named Luke Saint Hill read and reviewed the edition of Into the Void in which my work appeared. He said, it "contains a range of edgy and hard-won poems. I especially enjoyed Lauren Scharhag's 'Nuestra Señora de Ogilvie,' about a family hair washing ritual... There is tenderness and humour but it ends with a sting, navigating towards the 'price women pay' for beauty and acceptance." Cheers, Luke!

Follow him @lukesainthill for more lit mag musings.

Thank you, as always, for reading!

Saturday, January 27, 2018

January News

Hey, folks! 2018 is off and running. I had three publications this month I'm excited to share with you.

The first was my poem, "Migraine," which appeared on Duane's PoeTree Blog. This is one I wrote many moons ago. I've been a migraine sufferer since I was about seven years old, so it's a subject that I know a lot about. But I had never submitted it before because I didn't think it was good enough.

Back in November, I created an Instagram poetry account. (I'm @laurenscharhag, if you're interested.) I've been relying a lot on old writings for content, which means it's been a great opportunity to revisit my old stuff. Some of it is just as bad as I thought it was, but there were a few gems. I'm sure other writers can relate. In the course of looking for stuff I could post on my IG account, I found "Migraine," and decided to send it out. I am continuously learning that I am the worst judge of my own work. Don't be like me. Believe in yourself, and send the work out. You're bound to connect with somebody.

The second publication this month was, "That One I Wrote During the Eclipse," which appeared in The Broke Bohemian. The folks at TBB liked the poem so much, they made it this edition's Editor's Choice. I'm astonished and humbled that this meandering, stream-of-consciousness piece has been recognized in such a way. The title is, uh, self-explanatory? I've been trying to provide a bit of background on my poems in this blog. I guess I've been thinking it's important to show people something of a working poet's process. In this case, let's just say, it was a true story.

And finally, the third piece that saw print this month was a short story! I don't write nearly as many as I want to-- I'm still working on some novels, so when I do write prose, I tend to focus my energy on those. I'm hoping that when they're done, I can take some time to up my short story game. In the meantime, "The Seven Wives of Richard Copeland" appeared in Schlock! Magazine (UK). Do you love the old-school pulp cover art as much as I do?

"Seven Wives" is a riff on Lovecraft's story, "Pickman's Model." In my piece, a black market arts dealer named Eva is hired to hunt down some of Pickman's work for a collector. She finds it, and since this is a Lovecraftian tale, terrible things happen. Obviously.

One more bit of news before I sign off-- a friend from high school tagged me on IG. She wanted me to know that her son was reading and loving The Ice Dragon. She said, "I love that you have become the writer you dreamed of being all those years ago, and I love that I can share your words with my children." You guys, I teared up. This is the greatest reward a writer can ever hope to achieve. Thank you, friend, for sharing this moment with me. 

I feel like a broken record sometimes because I say, "Thank you," so much, and it's just the tiniest fraction of the gratitude that I feel. Thanks to all these lovely editors for believing in me. And, as always, thank you, kind readers. You're the whole reason I'm here.

Monday, January 1, 2018

December News

Happy 2018! I hope you've all had a terrific holiday season and are looking forward to the New Year/blank slate as much as I am. 

I closed out 2017 on an exceptionally high note. I am thrilled to share with everyone that my poem, "Meteor," received the 2017 Door is a Jar AwardI wrote "Meteor" shortly after David Bowie passed away. I had just watched The Man Who Fell to Earth, and had all that in mind when I wrote it. Truly, it's such an honor to have my work recognized. Getting published anywhere is always so rewarding-- to go beyond that really bowls me over. 

My work also made its third appearance in Darrell Laurant's Snowflakes in a Blizzard. I did an interview regarding The Ice Dragon-- apropos for the holidays. Every time I mention Snowflakes in a Blizzard on this blog, I encourage everyone to really spend some time browsing it. Laurant does a phenomenal job of sifting through the millions of indie authors out there and spotlighting unique voices. It's like the coolest little virtual book store. 

ICYMI, all of my titles are now available on Kindle Unlimited. This month, Our Miss Engel received a five-star review:

"Interesting and well-written. No goofy sparkly guys here! Frances Hodgson Burnett with a twist."

"The poet holds nothing back. She puts it all out there... This book takes me to the multidimensional sides of a person. Many poems in the book have an irreverent wildness. The persona engages in and is highly aware of the culture, the joys and horrors of it. She makes the reader think. Scharhag leaps and embraces vulnerability. There is a toughness, sexuality, and good vs evil in her poems. Her poems are honest, raw and dramatic. She speaks both of faith and of the uncles who turn stolen goods into coke, crack, hash and cash..."

Thanks very much to these kind readers! 

I've already got several publications lined up for 2018. I can't wait to see where the creative journey will lead next. 

Thanks, as always, for reading! Best wishes to all.